NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS




On a less carb diet program? Planning on sharing some of those less calorie dessert meals with your canine pets? You need to stop! That sugar-free meal you consider is suitable for you and your dog, in fact, could create a situation of you paying a visit to the veterinarian!

The sugar substitute, Xylitol, has been a great development in fighting against tooth decay and in helping diabetics to recover from their disorder. Yet, this well-known sweetener may be damaging to the family pet. A new study now being on air shows that consumption of Xylitol by dogs can become the reason for liver miscarriage and even their passing away. Reports from the ASPCA Poison Control Center shows the number of Xylitol exposed and affected pet is on the rise and that rise has increased the number of veterinarian visits.

For many years, veterinarians have questioned that Xylitol could make dogs sick, but an article in the October topic of the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (JAVMA) has taken into documentation the results of various issues of Xylitol consumptions in dogs from 2003 to 2005. Five of eight dogs passed away or had to be euthanized because of problems rooting from Xylitol consumption.

Usually found in human mints, sugar-free gums, toothpaste, and sweets, Xylitol, has been a famous sugar replacement since the 1960s. Yet, researchers found that even small volumes of Xylitol can become the reason of liver damage and even death in dogs.

Dogs that consume large volumes of Xylitol have sudden and huge drops in blood sugar levels, leading to lameness and non-coordinated movements. Occasionally, seizures may be found as well. Yet, even small volumes of Xylitol are not safe. As little as 1 gram of Xylitol can set off a chain of events resulting in liver destruction. A dog could get this amount in just a few candies or sticks of gum consisting of this sugar replacement. Xylitol can also be found in children’s chewable multi-vitamins, plain cough drugs, and even mouthwashes.

Even though most pet owners on daily basis feed some sort of “human food” to their dogs, the JAVMA report must be a wake-up call, showing that numerous foods that are safe for humans can develop trouble to pets.

 



Most of the dog keepers would acknowledge lack of understanding or maybe even an absence of accountability regarding hypertension or high blood pressure in dogs. Since, dogs don’t live the same high-stress lifestyle that most humans do and they’re not usually indulging in high-salt or high-fat diets, so why would they develop high blood pressure? Well, the answer may be a little more complicated than just lifestyle options.

One research showed that 93% of dogs with chronic kidney disorder suffers from high blood pressure. Other research cites that more than 60% of geriatric dogs (over 8 years old) also suffer from this usually silent condition. In humans, the most common cause of hypertension is called primary or essential, meaning that there is no underlying disease causing it. Dogs, on the other hand, most commonly develop secondary hypertension, which means that it is related with an underlying medical condition.

Blood pressure in humans is measured by slightly occluding an artery in an arm or leg. A stethoscope is then used to focus for the coming back of the pulse as the force is gradually released. This point is referred to as the systolic blood pressure, or the higher of the two numbers you will hear or read. Further, the force maintains to be discharged and when no pulse sounds are heard, that force is called the diastolic pressure. Blood pressure is then read as systolic over diastolic, for instance, 140 over 80. For dogs, the stethoscope is usually liable enough to hear the pulse sounds but it is actually not possible to find the diastolic pressure. Most veterinarians will normally record a pet’s blood pressure as the systolic count, or for instance, 180. Maximum veterinarians who use blood pressure quantification, use an ultrasonic probe to “hear” when the pulse comes back to the artery. The probe will then change that sign into an audible sound for the doctor. Professionals want both veterinarians and keepers to not be scared of a single high reading. The essential thing to keep in mind is that the results must be comparable.

Dogs usually suffer from secondary hypertension, or high blood pressure because of some underlying medical condition for example the extremely increasing acute kidney disorder in canines can progress to high blood pressure. Cushing’s disorder (an overproduction of cortisone by the body), and adrenal gland malignancy are other conditions that can lead to high blood pressure in dogs. With high blood force, blood vessels can begin to be thickened and extended and may ultimately tug and tear, becoming the reason for the bleeding. This may not be straight away noticeable, but as small vessels in the eye and in the kidneys start to be damaged, dogs will start to display medical symptoms. Signs of high blood pressure are usually unseen by the keeper. An abrupt or slow starting of blindness can be the single obvious symptom that your pet may have high blood pressure. High blood pressure can become worse with the existing kidney disorder, which can lead to bleeding in the brain, and will eventually influence every organ in the body.

Since high blood pressure usually result from one or more underlying medical conditions in our pets, therefore, treating the underlying medical conditions will usually control the high blood pressure. As with humans, for pets too very basic drugs are available to help enlarge blood vessels and decrease the force from the blood flow. However in addition to drugs, daily blood monitoring and blood force quantification will be extremely essential for the fitness of your pet. 

 



Whether brief and comparatively simple (such as routine dentistry ) or prolonged and complicated , virtually all feline surgical procedures require that the patient be anesthetized so that the operation can be efficiently and painlessly completed. An especially excitable or hypersensitive cat or dog may also have to be temporarily rendered unconscious during such relatively simple and noninvasive procedures as examining its ears or changing its bandages, since it may resist treatment and demonstrate its annoyance by thrashing about and clawing at the practitioner.

“Although anesthesia is used primarily for the patient’s benefit, sometimes it’s necessary for the veterinarian’s safety as well.

A local anesthetic blocks the pain pathways leading to the brain from a specific area of a pets  body, such as the mouth, a paw, or an ear. Because the sensation is blocked from being transmitted from that specific area to the brain, the patient cannot perceive it. Commonly used local anesthetic agents include lidocaine and bupivicaine. Depending on the agent, local anesthetics can be applied either by injection or, in the case of a superficial wound, topically. When a procedure requiring a local anesthetic gets underway, then we need to use general sedation or anesthesia.

Local anesthetics can also be used to anesthetize a larger region of the body, such as the abdomen. This is done by administering an epidural injection with local anesthetics, similar to the technique used in women during labor. Epidural anesthesia can also be used to anesthetize a hind limb during a fracture repair, for example. For more complicated procedures, or if the animal is intractable, general anesthesia is used. When a general anesthetic is used, all of the pathways in the nervous system that transmit pain from its source to the brain remain intact but the stimulus is blunted because the brain is asleep and the patient will not experience the pain. The attending veterinarian and/or an anesthesiologist select the types of anesthetics and specific agents to be used depending on the patient’s age and general health; the nature of the procedure; which organs are involved; and the time required for the drugs to take effect.

In a surgical procedure requiring general anesthesia, the patient is first given an injection that will sedate it, followed a short time later by administration of the selected drug, which will make the patient fall into a deep sleep. When the pet  is unconscious, a tube is inserted into its trachea to ensure that the passage to its lungs remains open and the cat receives a steady supply of oxygen while it is asleep. Then the cat is connected to a device enabling it to inhale an anesthetic gas, such as Isoflurane or Sevoflurane, throughout the operation. During the surgery, depth of anesthesia is monitored by checking the animal’s pulse, heart rate, mucus membrane color, reflexes and jaw tone. Many veterinarians use pulse oximeters to measure the oxygen content of the blood and blood pressure monitors are also commonplace. At our hospital  modern monitoring equipment is used, allowing close evaluation of the cat’s vital functions while under anesthesia.


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Body weight that is 20 percent or more above normal weight—is the most frequently observed nutritional disorder among domestic cats. Its clinical signs are clearly apparent and, when observed, should be taken seriously and addressed without delay.

Obesity will certainly inhibit a cat’s normal penchant for physical activity and surely compromise its quality of life. Significant overweight can also exacerbate several serious disorders. Among the conditions potentially aggravated by overweight are osteoarthritis, which is characterized by the erosion of cartilage, the smooth tissue in joints that protects the ends of bones from painfully rubbing directly against one another; hip dysplasia, a genetically inherited and incurable malformation in which the femoral head of a cat’s thigh bone does not fit properly into a socket at the lower end of the animal’s hip bone; and Diabetes Mellitus , a disease caused by insufficient production of or response to the hormone insulin, which is essential to the regulation of blood sugar. Cardiovascular health can also be impaired by obesity, since excessive weight places an extra burden on a cat’s heart and vascular system.

To assess the weight status of a cat, some veterinarians may use a nine-point scoring system, with score of 4.5 to 5 points indicating that an animal is at its ideal weight. A score of 9 would mean that a cat is grossly obese, while an emaciated, severely underweight cat would have a score of 1. Any cat that has a score above 6.5 or 7 would be classified as overweight, and a score of 8 or above would mean that the animal is severely overweight or obese.

An owner can also assess a cat’s physique by using a “Body Condition Score” chart available from pet food manufacturers(like Hills , Royal Canine , Purina). This assessment involves (1) a rib check, in which the owner runs both hands, palm facedown, across the animal’s ribcage on either side; (2) a profile check, in which the animal is viewed from the side; and (3) an overhead check, in which the owner looks down on the cat from above. In a severely obese cat, the ribs will not be palpable under a heavy layer of fat; there will be heavy fat deposits over the lumbar area, face, and limbs; the abdomen will be distended and the waistline will not be visible.

Any feline weight-reduction program should be carried out under the direction of a veterinarian,- “A cat that is put on a sudden starvation diet,” she warns, “is at risk of developing a serious health problem, such as hepatic lipidosis. What you want to aim for is a gradual weight loss, perhaps one or two percent loss of body weight per week. I always recommend that an owner of a chubby cat purchase a baby scale in order to monitor a cat’s weight at home. Gradual is the way to go!”


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What are tapeworms?

Tapeworms are flat intestinal worms that are made up of many small segments, each nearly about ¼ – ½” (3-5 mm) in length. Unlike roundworms that reside freely in the intestinal tract, tapeworms attach to the wall of the small intestine with the aid of their hook-like mouthparts.

Tapeworms belong to the cestode family of intestinal worms. The most common tapeworm of dogs and cats is Dipylidium canine. The mature or adult worms may reach up to 8 inches (20 cm) in length. The individual segments start to grow behind the head and move down the tapeworm as they slowly grow up, eventually being sectioned at the opposite end, either singly or in short chains. These sections, called proglottids, travel in the feces when an infected dog defecates. They are nearly about 1/8″ (3 mm) long and look like grains of rice or cucumber seeds. Sometimes they can be found walking on the hairs around the anus or on the edge of newly passed feces. As the tapeworm section dries down, it begins to be a golden color and ultimately breaks open, liberating the fertilized eggs into the surrounding. It is not like roundworms where dogs cannot be infected by eating fertilized tapeworm eggs. Tapeworms must first travel through an intermediary host (a flea) before they can infest a dog.

 

How do dogs get tapeworms?

When the affected eggs are released into the surroundings, they have to be absorbed by immature flea larvae in the surrounding. Once inside the larval flea, the tapeworm egg continues to grow as the flea matures into an adult flea. During grooming or with reaction to a flea sting, a dog can consume the tapeworm affected flea and completes the life cycle.

 

Are tapeworms harmful for my dog?

Tapeworms do not normally become the reason of severe health complications in dogs. Sometimes dogs will drag their bottoms on the ground, a way referred to as scooting, in order to relieve this irritation. Note that scooting can also take place for other causes such as impacted anal sacs.

In puppies, heavy tapeworm infestation can be severe. Lack of development, anemia, and intestinal obstructions can take place. Occasionally, the head of the tapeworm or scolex detaches from the intestinal wall; the complete adult tapeworm will then be passed in the feces or vomited up.

 

How is the diagnosis made?

Medical diagnosis is often made by noticing the white mobile tapeworm sections in the feces or crawling around the anus. They usually appear like grains of rice.

Tapeworm sections are only passed occasionally and that is why not identified on routine fecal inspection. If you see any sections, white or golden color, bring them to your veterinarian for a definitive diagnosis.

 

What is the cure?

With current available medications, a cure is reasonable and beneficial. The parasiticide may be fed either in the form of tablets or by vaccinations. It becomes the reason for the parasite to digest in the intestines so you normally will not see tapeworms traveled in the stool. These medicines are very safe and should not result in any side effects.

 

Is there anything else that should be done?

Flea control is crucial in the management and prevention of tapeworm infection. Flea control also includes treating the dog and the environment (for more information, see the Client Handout Flea Control in Dogs and Flea Control in Cats).Your veterinarian can suggest a safe and beneficial flea control for your pet. If your dog lives in flea-infested surroundings, re-infection with tapeworms may take place in as little as two weeks. 

 

Can I get tapeworms from my dog?

You cannot get tapeworms directly from your dog. Dipylidium canine, the most common canine tapeworm, requires flea as the intermediary host. A person must absorb an affected flea to begin to be infected with tapeworms. A few concerns of tapeworm infections have been accounted in children. Vigorous flea control will also eradicate any danger of children begin to be infected. 

Taenia breeds – These are tapeworms that are discovered by consuming prey or waste containing the infected larval phase. These are much larger tapeworms, often up to one yard (one meter) in length. Intermediary hosts consist of rodents, rabbits, hares and sheep. The intermediary phases grow hydatid cysts in several organs in the intermediary host. There are useful medications that will eradicate Taenia infestations in dogs. If your dog consumes prey such as rodents or rabbits, re-infection can take place with the passage of tapeworm sections in 6-8 weeks.

 

Echinococcus breeds – These are very small tapeworms, including only three or four sections, and are often less than 3/8″ (1 cm) in length. Intermediary hosts can be sheep, horses and sometimes man. In humans, the disease is referred to as hydatidosis, hydatid disorder, or hydatid cyst disorder, and ends up in cysts being shaped in the liver. The disorder is very rare in the United States but has been accounted in California, Arizona, New Mexico and Utah. Humans are affected by consuming polluted meat or by accidentally consuming eggs that have produced from the feces of dogs, coyotes or foxes harboring the adult tapeworm. Luckily, de-worming preparations, specifically those including praziquantel, are useful for eradicating this cestode from infected dogs.

Prevention of cestode tapeworm infestation also includes prevention of uncooked or partially cooked meat or meat by-products.

 

 


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What is pancreatitis?

The pancreas is an important organ that lies on the right-hand side of the abdomen adjacent to the stomach. The pancreas produces enzymes to help in food absorption and releases hormones such as insulin, which adjusts blood sugar or glucose metabolism.

When there is swelling or inflammation in the pancreas, the state is referred to as pancreatitis. Pancreatitis is common condition in the dogs. There is no age, sex, or breed predisposition.

 

“Severe pancreatitis may either take a mild, edematous shape or a more severe, hemorrhagic shape.”

 

Severe pancreatitis may either take a mild, edematous shape or a more severe, hemorrhagic shape. The associated swelling allows the digestive enzymes from the pancreas to reverse their direction and enter into the abdominal cavity ending up in secondary destruction to the liver, bile ducts, gallbladder, and intestines. A few dogs that recuperate from a severe event of pancreatitis may continue to have repetitive episodes of the disorder, which is then referred to as chronic or relapsing pancreatitis.

 

What is the reason behind pancreatitis?

Normally, pancreatic enzymes are produced in an inactive condition and pass through the pancreatic duct to the duodenum, part of the small intestine. Once they reach the small intestine, they are activated to start digestion. With pancreatitis, these enzymes are activated prematurely in the pancreas instead of later in the small intestine. Think of this as a time-release capsule that abruptly bursts before it reaches its projected aim; in this case, the pancreatic enzymes begin to absorb before they should. This ends up in absorbing of the pancreas itself. The medical symptoms of pancreatitis are usually variable, and the intensity of the disorder will be based on the volume of enzymes that will be prematurely in active mode. 

Although, the exact reason of pancreatitis is unknown, it may occur due to a fatty meal or corticosteroid administration. Yet, in most cases, it looks like its occurrence is sudden.

 

What are the medical symptoms of pancreatitis?

 The most common medical symptoms consist of nausea, vomiting, fever, lethargy, abdominal pain, diarrhea and reduced appetite. At the time of the episode, dogs may take a “praying position”, with their back end up in the air while their front legs and head are lowered onto the floor. If the condition is critical, severe depression, and even death may take place.

 

How is pancreatitis diagnosed?

Laboratory examinations often detect an increased white blood cell count; yet, an increased white blood cell count may also be due to many other disorders besides pancreatitis. The rise of pancreatic enzymes in the blood is the most helpful test in diagnosing in pancreatic disorder, but some dogs with pancreatitis might have normal enzyme levels. In recent years, a new pancreatic test has become available that can appropriately detect pancreatitis, even if pancreatic enzymes are normal. Radiographs may display changes in pancreas associated with inflammation, especially in the acute hemorrhagic shape. Ultrasound research usually provide diagnosis of pancreatic inflammation or local peritonitis caused by this state. Unfortunately, some dogs with pancreatitis, especially chronic pancreatitis, will elude revelation with many of these examinations. 

As a result, the diagnosis of pancreatitis may be tentative or presumptive in some cases and depends all on medical symptoms and clinical record.

 

How is pancreatitis treated? 

The successful management of pancreatitis will depend on former diagnosis and clinical surgery or therapy. With mild, edematous pancreatitis, the treatment is aided by “resting” the pancreas and allowing the body to get better itself. The only way to “turn off” the pancreas is to suppress all oral fluids and food so that the pancreas does not secrete any digestive enzymes that may inadvertently damage the pancreas or the surrounding organs.

 Analgesics will be given to control the intense pain and intravenous fluids will be given to maintain the normal fluid and electrolyte balance. Most cases will also need anti-inflammatory drugs to control vomiting or diarrhea. Antibiotics will be helpful if the simultaneous condition is questionable. Most dogs with pancreatitis are hospitalized for two to four days while intravenous fluids and medications are given and food is slowly restarted. With serious hemorrhagic pancreatitis, or if the dog is showing signs of systemic disease, extreme care using major quantities of intravenous fluids and medications should be provided to counteract shock.

 

What is the prognosis of pancreatitis?

The prognosis is based on the seriousness of the disorder when diagnosed and the reaction to initial treatment. Dogs that are seen with shock and depression have very hidden prognosis. Most of the mild pancreatitis has a good prognosis with an intense treatment. Dogs that are not treated may develop the hemorrhagic shape and suffer acute outcomes, consisting of sudden death.

 

Will there be any long-term complications?

 Many dogs recover in absence of any bad chronic outcomes. Yet, with serious or repeated incidents of pancreatitis, one or more of the following complications may grow.

If a considerable number of cells that produce digestive enzymes are damaged, a lack of actual food absorption occurs. This is called as exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) and can be treated with a daily intake of an enzyme replacement powder.

If a considerable number of cells that grow insulin are damaged, diabetes mellitus can be an outcome. 

In rare cases, painful growths between the abdominal organs may develop as an outcome of pancreatitis.


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What is canine hemorrhagic gastroenteritis?

Canine Hemorrhagic Gastroenteritis in DogsHemorrhagic gastroenteritis (HGE) is a serious disease in dogs characteristic of vomiting and bloody diarrhea. Most of the concerns arise when it occurs in the absence of any particular sign in an otherwise healthy dog. The most important medical symptom is high volumes of bloody diarrhea, mostly bright red in color. Some dogs may have a painful stomach, reduced appetite, lethargy (fatigue), or fever. HGE can influence any breed, age, size, or gender of dog, but it is especially common in small breed dogs. Adult miniature French poodles, miniature schnauzers, and Yorkshire terriers appears to be more commonly influenced. Other breeds that are influenced consists of the Pekingese, cavalier King Charles spaniel, Shetland sheepdog, and poodle.

 What are the causes for HGE?

“Tension, anxiety, and hyperactivity are considered to be possible factors in most cases of canine hemorrhagic gastroenteritis.”

 The exact reason of HGE continues to be unknown (idiopathic). It may be caused by dietary incaution (consuming considerably different foods than what the dog is supposed to), immune-mediated disorder, toxins, or pancreatitis. Stress, anxiety, and hyperactivity are considered to be possible factors in most cases. Current research shows that HGE may be an allergic reaction to the food consumed or inhaled. Intestinal parasites and bacteria may also be the reason behind it. Dogs that suffer from HGE are more prone to develop HGE in the future.

 

How is HGE diagnosed?

The diagnosis of HGE may be challenging and may eventually need intestinal biopsies on regular basis. Some possible reasons of HGE consist of the abdomen or intestinal ulcers, trauma, gastrointestinal tumors or obstruction, foreign bodies, infectious disorders such as canine parvovirus infection, and coagulation disorders. Diagnosis often requires a total blood count (CBC), biochemical examination of the blood, urinalysis, radiographs (x-rays), coagulation or clotting tests, fecal evaluation, and ultrasound or endoscopic tests of the gastrointestinal tract.

 The packed cell volume (PCV) or hematocrit (HCT)—a measurement of the proportion of red blood cells—is usually greater than 60% in dogs with HGE. Maximum dogs have a normal HCT of 37% to 55%. An increased HCT along with low or normal total solids (TS) is an essential sign that a dog may have HGE. Blood bicarbonate levels, blood pH levels, and serum chemistries also indicate that HGE may be present. Diagnosis is usually a procedure of eradicating other reasons of bloody stools and gastrointestinal distress.

 

How is HGE treated?

“Dogs with HGE will look like they are extremely sick and, if left untreated, may pass away.”

Gastroenteritis-hemorrhagic dogs will look like they are extremely sick and, if left untreated, may pass away. In most cases, the disease will run its course for a few days if the dog is provided with accurate and supportive care. Intravenous fluid therapy with potassium and electrolyte supplements is the core of HGE therapy. Subcutaneous fluids (given under the skin) are not often thought of as an adequate therapy to meet the important fluid needs of maximum dogs with HGE. Many dogs are not fed during the first 24 hours of treatment and are usually treated with antibiotics (such as ampicillin, enrofloxacin, or metronidazole) to combat potential secondary intestinal condition. Another method of treatment for HGE may consist of gastrointestinal protectants (sucralfate) and anti-vomiting drugs. In serious concerns, plasma or colloids may be required to correct seriously low blood protein levels.

If intravenous fluid therapy is not provided, the dog’s red blood cell count will keep on elevating because of the dehydration leading to potentially fatal clotting disease referred to as disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Once DIC has started, it is very difficult to recover and may result in the death of the dog.

 

Can HGE be avoided? 

As far as the reason is still not known, it is hard to give a piece of advice on prevention. Yet, significant recommendations are to feed a good quality protein diet, hold back from giving your dog extra foods or treats that he may not be supposed to have, use parasite preventative medications as suggested by your veterinarian, and provide low-stress surroundings.

 

 


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Most of the dog keepers would acknowledge lack of understanding or maybe even an absence of accountability regarding hypertension or high blood pressure in dogs. Since, dogs don’t live the same high-stress lifestyle that most humans do and they’re not usually indulging in high-salt or high-fat diets, so why would they develop high blood pressure? Well, the answer may be a little more complicated than just lifestyle options.

One research showed that 93% of dogs with chronic kidney disorder suffers from high blood pressure. Other research cites that more than 60% of geriatric dogs (over 8 years old) also suffer from this usually silent condition. In humans, the most common cause of hypertension is called primary or essential, meaning that there is no underlying disease causing it. Dogs, on the other hand, most commonly develop secondary hypertension, which means that it is related with an underlying medical condition.

Blood pressure in humans is measured by slightly occluding an artery in an arm or leg. A stethoscope is then used to focus for the coming back of the pulse as the force is gradually released. This point is referred to as the systolic blood pressure, or the higher of the two numbers you will hear or read. Further, the force maintains to be discharged and when no pulse sounds are heard, that force is called the diastolic pressure. Blood pressure is then read as systolic over diastolic, for instance, 140 over 80. For dogs, the stethoscope is usually liable enough to hear the pulse sounds but it is actually not possible to find the diastolic pressure. Most veterinarians will normally record a pet’s blood pressure as the systolic count, or for instance, 180. Maximum veterinarians who use blood pressure quantification, use an ultrasonic probe to “hear” when the pulse comes back to the artery. The probe will then change that sign into an audible sound for the doctor. Professionals want both veterinarians and keepers to not be scared of a single high reading. The essential thing to keep in mind is that the results must be comparable.

Dogs usually suffer from secondary hypertension, or high blood pressure because of some underlying medical condition for example the extremely increasing acute kidney disorder in canines can progress to high blood pressure. Cushing’s disorder (an overproduction of cortisone by the body), and adrenal gland malignancy are other conditions that can lead to high blood pressure in dogs. With high blood force, blood vessels can begin to be thickened and extended and may ultimately tug and tear, becoming the reason for the bleeding. This may not be straight away noticeable, but as small vessels in the eye and in the kidneys start to be damaged, dogs will start to display medical symptoms. Signs of high blood pressure are usually unseen by the keeper. An abrupt or slow starting of blindness can be the single obvious symptom that your pet may have high blood pressure. High blood pressure can become worse with the existing kidney disorder, which can lead to bleeding in the brain, and will eventually influence every organ in the body.

Since high blood pressure usually result from one or more underlying medical conditions in our pets, therefore, treating the underlying medical conditions will usually control the high blood pressure. As with humans, for pets too very basic drugs are available to help enlarge blood vessels and decrease the force from the blood flow. However in addition to drugs, daily blood monitoring and blood force quantification will be extremely essential for the fitness of your pet. 


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As human drugs speeds in the direction of an ever-expanding scope of science, the veterinary drugs are also aiming towards the same after the human drugs.

Advancements in human drugs seems to take place on a regular basis as research and recent technology accompanies new prospects and objective of treatment. Thus, veterinary drugs and therapy follows closely after. Within the past twenty years, new implements in diagnosis and clinical methods have extremely helped in extending a family pet’s or animal athlete’s life. But while these new sciences aims to complete their goals, they usually come with an intense cost.

When veterinarians started practicing twenty years ago, scalpel was their chief instrument in the surgery room. In present times, laser method have made it easy by shortening surgical pain and bleeding and reducing total surgery time. Endoscopy can release substances from a pet’s gastrointestinal tract and can bypass surgery at the same time. Arthroscopes and laparoscopes make joint and abdominal therapies as small procedures.

Developments in diagnosis such as ultrasound, echocardiography, and even MRI’s are starting to be more and more accessible in veterinary field. This means that sickness such as cancer that was once meant to be a critical diagnosis for pets are now considered as curable and usually with a good outcome. Muscle and bone complication that was once considered as the end of a career for equine and canine athletes can be diagnosed much earlier, usually before the animal has any sort of pain, so that treatment can be started before damaging trauma takes place.

Laser treatment provides a very strong beam of concentrated light that can cut past the tissue. It is exceptionally useful for very small and precise cuts for biopsies, eye therapy, and tumor removal. As the lasers on its own closes the blood vessels and nerve endings as it pierces, there is much less bleeding and pain. Many pet owners don’t mind the extra cost of laser procedures and ask questions about how laser can be useful for their pets in terms of the routine treatment procedures such as spays and neuters.

Ultrasound or “sonography” is another development that was once discovered at university veterinary hospitals as a valuable diagnostic procedure. Now the technology is considered as a major instrument in numerous veterinary practices. A tool referred to as a transducer gives away high frequency sound waves into an animal’s body and quantify and disturbs the patterns mirrored. A still or video image is made out on an examination screen. Ultrasound is not painful and is very safe on such delicate tissues like the eye, spinal cord, and fetuses. A special type of ultrasound referred to as echocardiography allows a veterinarian to exactly range the heart chambers and display heart valve operation which means much advanced diagnosis for common pet heart complications and more exact treatment.

Radio waves are also assisting veterinary dermatologists to inform and cure skin conditions in pets. Commonly used surgical means such as scalpel can alter or destroy delicate epidermal tissues, making the diagnosis even harder.

 


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Even though so many of us are scare of it, we make trips to our dentist on daily basis to make sure our mouth is healthy and our smile glimmering. Advanced dental management for pets has also developed rapidly and our pets are getting advantage from a trip to their dentist. That’s true…braces for Boxers, crowns for Collies and a root canal therapy for a Rottweiler is a comprehensive day at the Veterinary Dentist!

Whenever we pay a visit to the dentist, we are not surprised when the doctor let us know that we require having dental x-rays done. But, listening to the similar thing from your veterinarian might leave you alarmed. You will wonder, how will the pet stand for x-rays without moving?

Digital dental x-rays have started to be more standard at veterinary practices now covering the entire country. As a large percentage of our pets suffer from gingivitis or even more advanced periodontal disorder, this method is essential for veterinarians and veterinary dentists.

Most people are not aware, but most of the pet’s tooth lies beneath the gum line where you cannot notice or find any disorder.  Dr. Jan Bellows, a Diplomate in the American Veterinary Dental College elaborates, “Sixty percent of the tooth lies beneath the gum line. As far as companion animals don’t speak (to tell us where the pain lies), x-rays assist the veterinarian find what’s below.”

Dr. Brett Beckman, prior President of the American Veterinary Dental Society agrees that “42% of cats and 28% of dogs have unseen dental complications that we would never detect in absence of x-rays.”  So, while you might think that your pet’s teeth are just normal and in healthy state, the chances are that he or she is in actual losing bone and other important structures that assist in keeping the tooth in its position.  The best way to do x-rays is when the pet is lying under a general anesthetic.

Beyond examining for disorder, dental x-rays are also done when it comes to breed specific issues.  Various breeds have crowded teeth or even permanent teeth that never emerge above the gum line.  Boxers, Bulldogs and other short faced breeds also suffer from same problem that misalign teeth.

In the long run, dental problems and pain can disturb the daily routine life of dogs.  X-rays can assist veterinary dentists discover the cracked or broken tooth of an operational police dog or locate a tooth that has delayed eruption for a show dog.

Fortunately, your veterinary dentist is well prepared to resolve these problems. Broken teeth can be fixed with the help of crowns and root canals.  As Dr. Kenneth Lee, a veterinary dentist in Colorado claims, “Dog’s canine teeth extend well below the gum line and usually are associated with the jaw bone. Removing these teeth can result in acute pain of the jaws.”

For genetic complications, complete oral treatment and even braces are now available. It’s even possible to help offset the pain of serious dental condition.

Understanding the necessity of your pet’s dental care is a huge initial step for maximum pet keepers. Your pet doesn’t have to go through pain from dental problems and you don’t have to bear “doggy smell”.  Making a dental treatment plan with your veterinarian will not just avoid dental problems, but may put to end other health complications as well.

The initial step is to have your veterinarian do a comprehensive oral examination on your pet. Identify any areas of excessive tartar build-up and any other issues, such as broken teeth, bleeding gums or ulcerations in the mouth.

Further, if accurate, plan a thorough dental cleaning with your veterinarian.  Done under general anesthetic, cleaning will remove the tartar and plaque and will decrease bacteria that become the reason for severe sickness, such as heart disorder. Conducting digital x-rays permits the veterinarian to find what is beneath the gum line, a critical step in avoiding future dental complications.

After cleaning of teeth, your veterinarian may use an obstructive sealant to aid repel plaque-causing bacteria. This great tech – low cost – sealant gel is soothing to apply on at home and will assist avoid next build-up of plaque and tartar.

Home management is an important piece of the treatment plan for continuing to keep your pet’s dental health. From daily brushing to unique sprays, chew toys and even an obstruction sealant like OraVet, your veterinarian can help in making your pet’s teeth healthy.  Some foods are even made to assist remove plaque build-up!  The good part is that these products not only remove plaque and freshen up breath, they also might help your pet live a few years longer.

 


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Silicon Valley Pet Clinic’s Team is dedicated to providing our clients with the most beautiful smile together with the best pet protection available nowadays. Our Silicon Valley Pet Clinic is located at 3100 El Camino Real Santa Clara, CA 95051

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Working Hours

Mon 8:00 AM - 8:00 PM
Tue 8:00 AM - 8:00 PM
Wed 8:00 AM - 8:00 PM
Thu 8:00 AM - 8:00 PM
Fri 8:00 AM - 8:00 PM
Sat 8:00 AM - 2:00PM
Sun 8:00 AM - 2:00PM

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